LAWorld's 16th Annual Conference – Rio de Janeiro 2012


Brazil is South America's most influential country, an economic giant and it has one of the world's fastest growing economies, so it was the perfect destination for LAWorld’s 16th and largest Annual Conference.

Held in Rio de Janeiro in May 2012 and hosted by LAWorld’s Brazilian member firm, Doria Jacobina Rosado e Gondinho Advogados based in Rio de Janeiro and San Paolo, more than 45 delegates attended the 3 day event.

Chris Dixon (LAWorld’s Chair) welcomed delegates to the 2012 Conference. In particular, he welcomed representatives from seven new member firms present who have joined us during the past year (Brussels, Bogota, Budapest, Helsinki, New York, Prague and Texas).  He thanked our hosts for their considerable and invaluable support in organising our global event in their impressive city.

LAWorld annual conferences combine formal business and legal conference sessions with social and cultural events which encourage business networking and getting to know each other opportunities.

A selection of photographic memories of this and other LAWorld events will shortly be available for viewing on the new Gallery Section of the website which is currently being developed.

Showing the way to the LAWorld Rio Conference 2012

Showing the way to the LAWorld Rio Conference 2012

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Conference Room

Conference Room

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Oliver Gnehm

Andy Lustigman

Andy Lustigman

Roxana Kahale and Francisco Zubillaga

Roxana Kahale and Francisco Zubillaga

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Rio2012

Stefania, Valérie, J. Michel and Guy

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Valérie, Michael, Oliver and J.Michel

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Reception at Sugarloaf

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Oliver, Giorgio and Stefania

Arturo Fermandois

Arturo Fermandois

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Rio2012

James, Victor, Ernesto, Rodrigo, Juan and Isabelle

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Rio2012

Daniela, Victor, Helena and Isabelle

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Rio2012

Guy and Stefania

Stefania Caltabiano and Yoav Salomon

Stefania Caltabiano and Yoav Salomon

LAWorld conference delegates 2012

LAWorld conference delegates 2012

LAWorld conference delegates

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Groupshot

MJ, Erika, Yoav, Neels, Victo and Jacqui

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Laura, Andy, Matti and Matthijs

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Laura, Chris, Katie and Colin

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Marina, Victor, Helena and Val

The Amazon Team

The Amazon Team

Up the Amazon

Up the Amazon

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Rio2012

Piranha fishing

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LAWorld team in front of statue

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Sunrise on the Rio Negro

Sunrise on the Rio Negro

The Lagoon

The Lagoon

Sugar Loaf Mountain

Sugar Loaf Mountain

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rio2012

LAWorld News

An overview and the impact of the Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights

Consumers will likely be given greater ability to control what personal information is given to marketers and how such data is utilized

Consumer privacy is a critical concern with respect to online and electronic activity today. The Obama administration’s recent reintroduction of a Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights as well as regulatory scrutiny by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) appear to be a direct reaction to these growing concerns. In this series of articles, we will examine recent scrutiny of data collection practices and how businesses utilizing such data should modify their practices.

Background

President Obama first introduced the Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights in February 2012. Three years later, the President announced a reintroduction of the bill followed by the release of a draft bill on Feb. 27, 2015, based on the Fair Information Practice Principles. If enacted, the Bill of Rights would govern the collection and dissemination of consumer data with the potential hammer of the FTC having enforcement authority for failure to meet. The bill has the potential to govern not just the data broker’s use of consumer data, but the many businesses that collect and disseminate consumer data in order to provide targeted advertising.

The bill is designed to protect consumers from the release of their personal information as well as provide transparency and control over how data is kept and collected by marketers, and provide consumers with reasonable means to control the use of their personal data depending on the context and privacy risk. The proposed bill would require industry to develop and implement data collection codes. The failure of a data collector to comply with a governing industry standard would subject the business to enforcement from the FTC. The proposed legislation would apply to any commercial use of personal information and anything that could link to a specific individual via their computer or other smart device.

The bill is a reaction to the changing technologies that have become a reality in the relationship between companies and consumers. Additionally, recent data breaches have caused concern over the release of personal information by companies because of lack of regulation. As Americans continue to use new technologies to hold their personal information, the risk of a cyber attack exploiting their data becomes more likely.

The reintroduced bill should come as no surprise to those involved in data collection. A number of significant online businesses have come under FTC scrutiny for their lax or ineffective privacy practices. For example, in 2011, Google was subjected to FTC liability with respect to its social network, Buzz, which caused its Gmail users to believe they had the option to join the new social network. However, user declines to join the network were ineffective, and user acceptances had misleading privacy controls over personal information. As a violation of the FTC Act, Google reached a final settlement with the FTC barring Google from future misrepresentations as well as an improved privacy program. In 2012, the FTC also settled with Facebook over the social media giant’s lack of transparency in its privacy policies and for allegedly deceiving consumers into thinking that their personal information was kept private when it was in fact made public. More recently, the FTC began exploring Apple’s HealthKit platform on its latest iPhone model and its built-in data health collection. Apple has responded that while the health data will be stored by the HealthKit, it will not be accessible in iCloud or any apps, and Apple has ensured that user data will not be sold to third parties. While the FTC has yet to launch a formal investigation, Apple’s upcoming iWatch release may cause the FTC to continue to monitor Apple’s data collection practices.

For more information contact Andy Lustigman, Olshan.  alustigman@olshanlaw.com 

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Upcoming Events

Europe/Middle East Regional Meeting and Lawyers Next Generation (Bratislava) from 5pm on Friday the 5th of February, 2016 to 5pm on Saturday the 6th of February, 2016

Europe/Middle East Regional Meeting (Milan) from 5pm on Friday the 18th of September, 2015 to 5pm on Saturday the 19th of September, 2015

2015 LAWorld Annual Conference & AGM (Washington DC, USA) from 6pm on Tuesday the 28th of April, 2015 to 2pm on Friday the 1st of May, 2015

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